3D printed components of microbial fuel cells: Towards monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication using additive layer manufacturing

How to cite this record

You, J. and Preen, R. J. and Bull, L. and Greenman, J. and Ieropoulos, I. (2017) 3D printed components of microbial fuel cells: Towards monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication using additive layer manufacturing. UWE, http://researchdata.uwe.ac.uk/180.

UWE Harvard citation (for UWE users)

You, J. and Preen, R. J. and Bull, L. and Greenman, J. and Ieropoulos, I. (2017) 3D printed components of microbial fuel cells: Towards monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication using additive layer manufacturing. UWE data repository [online]. Available from: http://researchdata.uwe.ac.uk/180 [Accessed 22 December 2018].

Project Title

3D printed components of microbial fuel cells: Towards monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication using additive layer manufacturing

Brief summary of project

For practical applications of the MFC technology, the design as well as the processes of manufacturing and assembly, should be optimised for the specific target use. Another rising technology, additive manufacturing (3D printing), can contribute significantly to this approach by offering a high degree of design freedom. In this study, we investigated the use of commercially available 3D printable polymer materials as the MFC membrane and anode. The best performing membrane material, Gel-Lay, produced a maximum power of 240 ± 11 µW, which was 1.4 fold higher than the control CEM with PMAX of 177 ± 29 µW. Peak power values of Gel-Lay (133.8 – 184.6 µW) during fed-batch cycles were also higher than the control (133.4 – 160.5 µW). In terms of material cost, the tested membranes were slightly higher than the control CEM, primarily due to the small purchased quantity. Finally, the first 3D printable polymer anode, a conductive PLA material, showed significant potential as a low-cost and easy to build MFC anode, producing a stable level of power output, despite poor conductivity and relatively small surface area per unit volume. These results demonstrate the practicality of monolithic MFC fabrication with individually optimised components at relatively low cost.

Associated Publication Links

http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/30700/ (UWE Research Repository)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seta.2016.11.006 (UWE Research Repository)

Publisher

UWE

Details

Item Type: Dataset
Methodology: 1. Scanning electron microscopy (model name-XL30, Philips) was used to examine the structural changes in the tested membranes and anode surfaces. 2. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) was determined using the potassium dichromate oxidation method (COD MR test vials, Camlab, UK) and results were recorded manually. 3. For the volume resistivity of the tested anode material, a 4-wire resistance measurement was carried out with a digital multimeter (M-3850D, METEX, Korea) and bench power supply (PSM-3004, GW INSTEK, Taiwan). Results were recorded manually. 4. Power output of the MFCs was monitored continuously in real time in volts (V) using an ADC-24 Channel Data Logger (Pico Technology Ltd., UK). Data was saved in PLW file. Weekly polarisation measurements were carried out using an automated computer-controlled variable resistor system. 5. Details of data collection and process can be found in the manuscript.
Language of the Dataset Collection: English
Creators: You, J. and Preen, R. J. and Bull, L. and Greenman, J. and Ieropoulos, I.
UWE Faculty/Department: Faculty of Environment and Technology > Department of Engineering Design and Mathematics
UWE Research Centres/Institutes: Faculty of Environment and Technology > Bristol Bio-Energy Centre
Depositing User: Dr J. You
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2017 09:23
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2017 09:23

Data files

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experimental data.zip
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

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